What is a Graphite Shaft?

What is a Graphite Shaft?

Golf is a sport in which there is a lot of equipment that is needed to play the game.

A golfer is allowed fourteen golf clubs in their bag and some of these golf clubs will feature the immensely popular Graphite Shafts.

Graphite Shafts are lighter than steel and come in a range of distinctive designs and specifications.

What is a Graphite Shaft?

A Graphite Shaft is a long-tapered tube that connects the golfer’s hands to the clubhead via a golf grip.

A Graphite Shaft is lighter compared to a steel shaft and will come in a range of unique designs and specifications to suit a golfers ability level.

A graphite shaft is a golf club shaft made from carbon and has been used by many of the top golfers in the world.

A graphite shaft is lighter and has more flexibility than steel and was made to help golfers generate more distance.

They are typically stronger than aluminium but less flexible than steel. The amount of flex provided by a graphite shaft varies depending on its type, length, stiffness, and diameter.

What is a Graphite Shaft?

What is a Graphite Shaft Made of?

Graphite Golf Shafts are made of carbon fibre and are also known as a carbon fibre shaft.

A graphite shaft is made of a single strand of carbon fibre wrapped around a lightweight aluminium tube.

The carbon fibre provides the strength and stiffness needed to ensure accurate distance and direction, whilst the lightweight aluminium tube provides strength yet is lightweight enough for a golfer to swing efficiently.

Which Golf Clubs have Graphite Shafts?

The main golf clubs that will feature graphite shafts are the Driver and the Woods. These types of golf clubs are designed for distance and the lightweight and flexible makeup of a graphite shaft will help golfers achieve their clubhead speed potential.

Golf Hybrid clubs and some golf irons will also be fitted with graphite shafts, but these will be targeted at specific types of golfers.

One golf club that will not feature a graphite shaft is the putter. Putters are best fitted with a steel shaft as steel is firmer and will enhance the feel on the greens.

Are some Graphite Shafts Better Than Others?

There are many diverse types of graphite shafts available on the market and some may be a better composition model as opposed to others.

Top-quality golf shafts can be expensive, but most of the top of the range golf drivers or woods, will be fitted with a high-end golf shaft.

The less expensive shafts are not as durable as some of the more expensive golf shafts and will not perform as well.

The quality of the shaft comes down to the materials used to create the golf shaft and the amount of research and design that has gone into creating the high-end graphite shafts.

Who Should Use a Graphite Shaft?

Graphite shafts have been proven to help generate distance so most golfers that have a driver in their bag which is needed for distance, should use a graphite shaft in their driver and their woods.

Graphite is lighter and more flexible than a steel shaft, but they do come in different flexes and can still help with distance and direction for some of the more accomplished golfers.

Graphite shafts in irons are more targeted at golfers that do not generate a faster clubhead speed. Some beginners would benefit from graphite shafts in their irons, but they are more targeted at golfers with slower than average swing speeds.

Should I use a Graphite Shaft?

All golfers should have graphite shafts in their driver and their woods.

Most woods and drivers are already fitted with a graphite shaft from the golf manufacturer before they hit the shop floor and steel shafts are rare in drivers and woods these days.

Graphite shafts in golf irons all come down to clubhead speed, so it is important to get fitted for your golf clubs.

Golfers that struggle to generate an average swing speed should investigate getting graphite shafts fitted in their golf irons. This will help them enhance the distance they hit their irons and help them reach their playing potential.

Is it better to have Graphite or Steel Shafts?

Graphite Shafts help generate distance, so it is important that the drivers and woods come fitted with graphite golf shafts.

Graphite shafts are better than steel shafts in the woods or drivers, but not so much for irons, depending on the clubhead speed of a golfer.

If a golfer has an amazingly fast swing speed and they use graphite in their irons, they will likely struggle with direction as graphite shafts are more flexible. This will make it difficult to square the clubface at impact and make it tough to achieve any kind of consistency out on the golf course.

All golfers should have graphite shafts in their woods and drivers but should be fitted for the correct shaft flex and weight. Graphite shafts come in a range of weights and flexes to suit the ability levels and clubhead speed of different golfers.

To determine if graphite shafts would be a better option in the irons, a golfer should get a golf club fitting and have their clubhead speed measured.

Graphite shafts in the irons are more targeted at golfer with a below average clubhead speed as they will help generate more distance.

How Can you tell between Graphite and Steel Shafts?

It is normally easy to tell the difference between graphite shafts and steel shafts.

Steel shafts look like steel and are normally silver. The only time this can be difficult is when a steel shaft has a matte black finish and can occasionally look like a graphite shaft.

Graphite Shafts come in a range of colours and will normally have quite a bit of branding on them from the company that manufactured them.

Graphite shafts have a distinctive look and texture about them and are normally easy to tell the difference over a steel shaft.

Who Makes Graphite Golf Shafts?

There are many different golf companies that make graphite shafts and some of them concentrate on just the golf shaft itself.

A lot of these companies spend a lot of money on research and design to produce golf shafts that perform well for golfers of all different ability levels.

Can I buy a Specific Golf Shaft for my Driver?

As your golf games improves, it is always best to get fitted by a club fitter for a golf shaft that will suit your swing speed, launch angle and overall ability level.

Golf clubs will come fitted with a number of different shafts that have been evaluated to work very well with a specific golf club head, but shafts can be purchased for a driver head at an additional fee.

There are a number of particularly good club fitting experts and resources to visit to help determine which shaft will be best for your golf game, but make sure you are hitting a consistent enough golf ball before venturing down this path.

Do Golf Professionals Use Graphite Shafts?

Golf Professionals do use graphite shafts, but as mentioned earlier in this post, they will be fitted in their woods and driver.

Graphite shafts were made to help golfers with distance and technology has made golfers be able to get fitted for a golf shaft that will help their game.

It is rare for a golf professional to use graphite shafts in their irons, but this would always be determined by getting fitted and getting a consistent measurement of a golfers clubhead speed and flight characteristics.

Graphite golf shafts come in a range of weights, flexes, kick points and torque levels so golfers that can make a repeatable and consistent golf swing can get their clubs fitted with the best possible graphite shafts for their game.

Conclusion

A Graphite Golf Shaft is an essential tool to that is fitted into the clubheads to help golfers generate more distance on the golf course.

A Graphite Shaft is lighter and more flexible than a steel shaft and this works well for the longer golf clubs that generate more clubhead speed.

There are many different Graphite Golf Shafts to choose from, but many of the high-end golf clubs have been fitted with a golf shaft that will work very well with a specific clubhead.

If you want to learn more about some of the Basics of the Game of Golf. Check out the three Posts below.

Golf Wedge Bounce, Explained

How to Choose Golf Balls

Why Golfers Take Golf Divots?